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Climate change in New Guinea and its potential effects on freshwater ecosystems

by Polhemus, Dan A. (Dan Avery).
Type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Bishop Museum Technical Report no. 42(3); Climate Change and Biodiversity in Melanesia (CCBM) Paper 3.Publisher: Honolulu, USA Bishop Museum 2008Description: i, 7 p. 30 cm.Subject(s): Climatic changes -- Environmental aspects -- Papua New Guinea | Freshwater ecology -- Papua New GuineaOnline resources: Click here to access online Summary: "Although it is clear that long-term climate changes will have an effect on freshwater ecosystems in New Guinea, there is little data at hand by which to directly or objectively evaluate such patterns. Both precipitation and stream gauging data is inconsistent and widely scattered in terms of geographic coverage, and for the most part does not provide information across sufficiently long time intervals to accurately project trends. It is possible, however, to assess potential impacts from studies conducted in other parts of the Pacific, most notably Hawaii. In general, it is possible to consider potential impacts of long-term climate to New Guinea freshwater systems in the context of two alternative outcomes – increasing or decreasing precipitation regimes."
List(s) this item appears in: Climate change
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Location Call number Status Date due
MAIN LIBRARY Noumea
D 577.220 995 POL 2008 Available

Includes bibliographical references (p. 6-7)

"Although it is clear that long-term climate changes will have an effect on freshwater ecosystems in New Guinea, there is little data at hand by which to directly or objectively evaluate such patterns. Both precipitation and stream gauging data is inconsistent and widely scattered in terms of geographic coverage, and for the most part does not provide information across sufficiently long time intervals to accurately project trends. It is possible, however, to assess potential impacts from studies conducted in other parts of the Pacific, most notably Hawaii. In general, it is possible to consider potential impacts of long-term climate to New Guinea freshwater systems in the context of two alternative outcomes – increasing or decreasing precipitation regimes."