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Palaeoecology and Resilience in Melanesia how can palaeoecology contribute to climate change response planning?

by Hope, Geoffrey S.
Type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Bishop Museum Technical Report 42(4); Climate Change and Biodiversity in Melanesia (CCBM) Paper 4.Publisher: Honolulu, USA Bishop Museum 2008Description: i, 10 p. ill., photograpghs, graphs 30 cm.Subject(s): Climatic changes -- Environmental aspects -- Melanesia | Paleoclimatology -- Melanesia | Paleoecology -- Melanesia | Resilience (Ecology) -- Melanesia | Climate change mitigation -- MelanesiaOnline resources: Click here to access online Summary: "Information about the effects of changes experienced by biomes comes from the reconstruction of past vegetation and fauna based on biological fossils supported by dating. Records of environmental change are preserved in landforms and deposits such as lake, bog and cave sediments, alluvial and colluvial mantles and glacial moraines. Such information about past communities can contribute to climate change response planning by helping to define the amount and rate of change already experienced and hence the likely ability of ecosystems and species to endure change."
List(s) this item appears in: Climate change
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Location Call number Status Date due
MAIN LIBRARY Noumea
D 560.450 995 HOP 2008 Available

Includes bibliographical references (p. 9-10)

"Information about the effects of changes experienced by biomes comes from the reconstruction of past vegetation and fauna based on biological fossils supported by dating. Records of environmental change are preserved in landforms and deposits such as lake, bog and cave sediments, alluvial and colluvial mantles and glacial moraines. Such information about past communities can contribute to climate change response planning by helping to define the amount and rate of change already experienced and hence the likely ability of ecosystems and species to endure change."